I Am The Best

Posted on Posted in Basic Photography, DSLR

I AM THE BEST

Can you say that to yourself?

Sure, if I know all these stuffs, you might answer, but the thing is, you only know the triangle exposure (download the e-book about triangle exposure, for FREE). But the thing is, all these stock knowledge won’t make one superior to anyone. What matters is WHAT YOU DO WITH WHAT YOU KNOW.

Let me tell you a story.

One night, there was a guy, let’s give him a name – Paul. Paul was an amateur photographer. He was sitting in a bar with his friends, drinking beer while watching the performing band. Then a blinding flash of light caught his attention. There was a woman, let’s call her Sophie, not far away from where he was, trying to have a good picture of the performers. After that blinding shot, Sophie looked at the camera screen and her face grimaced. Without putting an effort to think, Paul absolutely knew that the picture was not good, and he knew WHY.

He knew that because the place was very dark (they were in a bar), the camera will use the flash automatically. And because Sophie was nowhere near her subject, she probably had captured the faces of her friends instead, the nearest to the flash being overly exposed, the farthest being underexposed, and the subject? Nowhere to be found. Of course Sophie didn’t want that, so she turned off the flash and tried to fire a shot again.

Paul smiled to himself while she saw Sophie trying for another shot. For the second time, it was evident in Sophie’s face how unsatisfying the photos were. So she tried again. Paul knew that no matter how many times Sophie pressed the shutter button, it was close to impossible that the girl would get what she wanted. Because Paul knew why.

After few tries, Sophie stood up and walked towards the stage. Apparently, she hasn’t given up yet. The night was too young to surrender. She sat at the best possible place. She angled her camera and fired several shots. When the band ended the show, Sophie went back to her table and showed her friends her shots. Some were okay, but most were really bad. But she was happy anyway.

Paul thought to himself, her efforts were in vain. Then he realized, at least she did something. He did nothing.

If she is an amateur photographer like Paul, she would have taken two or three shots and she’s done. She should’ve had more time enjoying the song. But guess what, Sophie enjoyed taking the pictures. And she experienced something. At the end of the day, it is what we do that matters the most. Sophie put herself out there. She made a lot of mistakes, yes, but the point is, she tried, she did something. Over 30 photos she took, there was one or two beautiful shots. And that was enough to make her feel satisfied. And next time, she won’t do the same mistakes again.

That’s how you learn. There will always be something that you don’t know. Learning is a process. And it’s a long way process. Someone has to start somewhere. You will never get to where you want, unless you start.

Until then. If you find this blog helpful in any way, please do subscribe to my mailing list, and in return, you’ll receive your free e-Book. This is the first e-book that I’ve written, I believe this has been one of the fundamentals of photography – this is the learning curve of every thing that I know.

 

Photo credit: unsplash.com

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